Creativity According to Psychology

I would like you all to get familiar with the concept of creativity. So let's begin with how exactly do psychologists define creativity?

Lewis Hart 26 Sep, 2018 3:38 pm Creativity, Psychology, Art 28



Creativity According to Psychology

Creativity is not a single personality trait, but a set of traits.  Basic elements of the concept of creativity include:

  • Intelligence
  • Intensive Interest
  • Knowledge
  • Originality (Ideas)
  • Creative Instinct
  • Non-Conformity
  • Courage
  • Persistence

Psychologists differentiate creativity in two forms:

  1. "Exceptional Creativity"  - Give an upswing to significant works which are meaningful for the whole society and bring the fame.
  2. "Everyday Creativity" -  Happens in everyday life pursuits involving a certain measure of originality, such as writing rhymes or fabricating valuable collections. The irony is that the characteristics mentioned above are essential for achieving exceptional creativity.

The “four c” model of creativity will help you understand it in a much better way especially for those who are considering a master's degree in education:

  1. “Mini-C” - Creativity involves subjectively meaningful ideas and insights that are known only to the self.
  2. Little-C” - Creativity involves an ordinary thinking and problem-solving. This type of creativity helps people solve everyday problems they face and adapt to varying environments.
  3. “Pro-C” - Creativity takes place among professionals who are skilled and creative in their particular fields. These individuals are creative in their trade or profession but do not achieve fame for their works.
  4. “Big-C” -  Creativity involves creating works and ideas that are deemed great in a selective field. This type of creativity leads to prominence and acclaim and often leads to world-changing creations such as medical innovations, technological advances, and artistic achievements.

For me, insanity is super sanity. The normal is psychotic. Normal means lack of imagination and lack of creativity.

About The Author

A psychiatrist and a philosopher. 

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